Glass Colors & Types
Transparent
Opaque
Milk Glass
Carnival
Opalescent
Iridized
Satin
Decorated
Burmese
Burmese one of the most misused terms used to describe colors seen in online Fenton hen and rooster listings-especially on eBay! Often painted Fenton hens and
roosters are titled and described as Burmese, when that is not the case!

Burmese is a type of glass, with a custard base accented with varying shades of deep rose to light pink blush, which is desired in Fenton's Burmese. This blush is
brought out due to gold in the glass mix and is a not painted decoration!

The photos below depict an unpainted Burmese rooster box, and one that is painted in the Folk Art design of 1998. Studying the differences between the two will help
collectors recognize which are Burmese and which are painted, in this case on ivory glass. The first major clue in determining which is which is the color of the inside of the
rooster top and base, which are left unpainted. The real Burmese rooster is shows the Burmese coloring of that type of glass inside and out.
BUYERS BEWARE! Often painted hen on nest and rooster boxes are
listed as Burmese, when in fact these items are usually made of
white satin glass that's decorated with hand painted and airbrushed
designs. The interiors of the rooster top and its base are left
Since Fenton's Burmese glass contains gold in the glass mix, which
when reheated by Fenton's glass artisans is what brings the
gorgeous blush, Burmese is known for, out in contrast against the
custard base color of Burmese.

NOTE: As of January, 2010, there has never been a Burmese Hen on
Nest produced by Fenton, although there have been many colors and
painted designs used to decorate Fenton's hen on nest dishes.

To date, Fenton's only inline Burmese Rooster Boxes and 8.5"
standing Roosters made by Fenton are decorated with the Coral Bells
design and are marked with a logo indicating that Rooster Box was
made after 1999. A 5" standing rooster in Burmese was made for
QVC by Fenton, decorated with a painted floral design.

Although some Fenton enthusiasts notice the slight differences of
Fenton's various colors feature, other collectors, who may be new to
Fenton collecting, may not see these differences and frequently rely
solely on the Seller's description of the item and its color. Some Fenton
"colors" and/or glass types and treatments cost more to produce, such
as Burmese, which is made with gold in the mix. Burmese Glass is often
used to describe the "color" of Fenton's painted hen on nest and
Rooster boxes when they are actually painted over a type of glass that
is not as expensive as Burmese to produce.  This page is designed to
help collectors determine which color is which.

Without a ware number and a color code included in an online listing,
some Fenton colors can be difficult to determine from eBay and other
Internet photos and descriptions. Some sellers who aren't familiar with
Fenton, and their variety of glass treatments and types may mistakenly
neglect to mention a Fenton glass color characteristic that may be key
to avoiding a duplicate purchase.
In this group of photos, an Ivory Rooster Box, painted to
match that year's Fenton Folk Art Animals is on the right. An
unpainted Burmese Rooster Box is on the left.  Study the
interiors of the bases of these two rooster boxes. The
marbled pink and custard Rooster Box top and base shown
on the left are clearly different from the interiors of the
painted rooster box, shown to the right in the photo, and
its interior which shows its original white color, prior to its
paint job being applied.
BUYERS BEWARE! Often painted hen on
nest and rooster boxes are listed as
Burmese, when in fact these items are
usually made of white satin glass that's
decorated with hand painted and
airbrushed designs. The interiors of the
rooster top and its base are left unpainted,
showing the original color. There was no
Fenton hen on nest dishes, or Hen Egg
Plates
The #4680  Rooster Boxes shown in the photo below, depict an unpainted Burmese Rooster Box on the left,
with a painted #4680 Rooster Box on the right.  Although at first glance these Rooster Boxes appear similar,
the Fenton Rooster Box shown on the right, ware # 4680 FK, is made of ivory glass that's been painted in the
Brown and Rose hues of the natural look used for the 1998 Fenton Folk Art Animals.  A quick study of the
interior of the rooster top and his base reveal they have been left unpainted, showing the original color of the
rooster top and base, in this case ivory.  The Burmese rooster top and base are the same inside and out.
www.FentonAddict.com
Enjoy the Art of Online Collecting~
For Collectors, by Collectors.
listed as Burmese, when in fact these items are usually made of
white satin glass that's decorated with hand painted and airbrushed
designs. The interiors of the rooster top and its base are left
unpainted, showing the original color.

Since Fenton's Burmese glass contains gold in the glass mix, which
when reheated by Fenton's glass artisans is what brings the
gorgeous blush, Burmese is known for, out in contrast against the
custard base color of Burmese.

NOTE: As of Fenton's closing, there was never a Burmese Hen on
Nest produced by Fenton! However, there have been many colors
and painted designs used to decorate Fenton's hen on nest dishes.

To date, Fenton's only inline Burmese Rooster Boxes and 8.5"
standing Roosters made by Fenton are decorated with the Coral Bells
design and are marked with a logo indicating that Rooster Box was
made after 1999. A 5" standing rooster in Burmese was made for
QVC by Fenton, decorated with a painted floral design.
Fenton's glass colors, and the painted designs used to enhance their art
glass poultry, are beautiful, to say the least.

Although some Fenton enthusiasts notice the slight differences of
Fenton's various colors feature, other collectors, who may be new to
Fenton collecting, may not see these differences and frequently rely
solely on the Seller's description of the item and its color. Some Fenton
"colors" and/or glass types and treatments cost more to produce, such
as Burmese, which is made with gold in the mix. Burmese Glass is often
used to describe the "color" of Fenton's painted hen on nest and
Rooster boxes when they are actually painted over a type of glass that
is not as expensive as Burmese to produce.  This page is designed to
help collectors determine which color is which.

Without a ware number and a color code included in an online listing,
some Fenton colors can be difficult to determine from eBay and other
Internet photos and descriptions. Some sellers who aren't familiar with
Fenton, and their variety of glass treatments and types may mistakenly
neglect to mention a Fenton glass color characteristic that may be key
to avoiding a duplicate purchase.
BUYERS BEWARE! Often painted hen on nest and rooster boxes are listed as
Burmese, when in fact these items are usually made of white satin glass that's
decorated with hand painted and airbrushed designs. The interiors of the
rooster top and its base are left unpainted, showing the original color.
In 1980, to the delight of collectors, Fenton began embedding a tiny number with their logos, which we call a the
color of Fenton's hens and roosters since some colors, glass types &/or treatments used by Fenton for their hen
on nest dishes, and their Rooster Boxes, appear very similar in color and/or glass type. However, each Fenton
color is different, albeit slightly so, than Fenton's other colors and glass types.  Each color, glass type, &/or
painted design is called a different name by Fenton, and given a Color Code, as a suffix to the completed item's
ware number.  

The subtle differences between the various similar colors can be difficult to determine from photos on the
Internet, especially when the sellers "adjust" the color and/or brightness of the hens and roosters they list. Even
some of the decorated, hand painted hen on nest dishes and rooster boxes appear similar in color, with the
exception of small details that some sellers may incorrectly describe in their listing for the item. Some buyers
may also miss seeing these differences in the photos provided by the seller. Unfortunately, as discussed above,
many painted hens and roosters are listed as Burmese, when they are not! The key to determining which items
are Burmese and which are painted is simple enough by studying the bottoms and interiors of the item in
question. Painted pieces are generally left unpainted on the interiors of the hen and rooster tops and bases, while
those that are Burmese show that color on the interiors of the top and base. Fenton's standing painted roosters
show their actual color on the underside of the rooster.


Using Fenton's embedded Decade Indicator can help determine which colors are which, based on the decade
during which the Fenton hen or rooster was made. This can help collectors avoid duplicate hen on nest purchases,
even when the colors/treatments of the hens and roosters seem almost identical.


Often the Seller's descriptions of the color(s) of the Fenton hens and roosters they list is subjective and does not
necessarily describe the color's name accurately, or with the name of the colors &/or treatments used by Fenton.
The last 2 letters, or a combination of a number and a letter, are used by Fenton as Color Codes to complete the
ware number for specific hen on nest dishes.



There are several colors that have been used to produce Fenton's hens and roosters, with special treatments and
glass types also used. Learning what these colors and treatments look like is a major step towards learning to
recognize which color is which.
The photos to the left provide an excellent example
of the visible differences between the painted
rooster box on the right, and the unpainted Burmese
Rooster Box on the left.  Study the interiors of the
bases of these two rooster boxes. The marbled pink
and custard Rooster Box top and base shown on the
left are clearly different from the interiors of the
painted rooster box, shown to the right in the
photo, and its interior which shows its original white
color, prior to its paint job being applied.
The #4680  Rooster Boxes shown in the photo
below, depict an unpainted Burmese Rooster Box on
the left, with an Ivory #4680 Rooster Box that has
been painted on the right.  Although at first glance
these Rooster Boxes appear similar, the Fenton
Rooster Box shown on the right, ware # 4680 FK, is
made of ivory glass that's been painted in the Brown
and Rose hues of the natural look used for the 1998
Fenton Folk Art Animals.  A quick study of the
interior of the rooster top and his base reveal they
have been left unpainted, showing the original color
of the rooster top and base, in this case ivory.  The
Burmese rooster top and base are the same inside
and out.
How can collectors and sellers determine the Fenton colors, glass types and treatments of their
hens and roosters? Read on below to begin learning how to avoid duplicate purchases of the
same color.
be very helpful to collectors, which we call a Decade Indicator.    Some
colors &/or treatments used by Fenton for their #5186 hen on nest dishes
appear very similar in color, although each Fenton color is different than the
others, and are called by different names by Fenton.  The subtle differences
between the various similar colors can be difficult to determine from photos
on the Internet.  Often the Seller's descriptions of the color(s) of the Fenton
hens and roosters they list is subjective and does not necessarily describe
the color's name accurately, or with the name of the colors &/or treatments
used by Fenton. The last 2 letters, or a combination of a number and a
letter, are used by Fenton as Color Codes to complete the ware number for
specific hen on nest dishes.
The hens shown below are both Fenton's
#5186, 5" hen on nest dishes. Although they
lack color, there are differences between the
two, and different ware numbers with color
codes representing their color &/or
treatment(s). The top hen
In 1980, to the delight of collectors, Fenton began embedding a tiny number with their logos, which we call a the
color of Fenton's hens and roosters since some colors, glass types &/or treatments used by Fenton for their hen
on nest dishes, and their Rooster Boxes, appear very similar in color and/or glass type. However, each Fenton
color is different, albeit slightly so, than Fenton's other colors and glass types.  Each color, glass type, &/or
painted design is called a different name by Fenton, and given a Color Code, as a suffix to the completed item's
ware number.  

The subtle differences between the various similar colors can be difficult to determine from photos on the some of
the decorated, hand painted hen on nest dishes and rooster boxes appear similar in color, with the exception of
small details that some sellers may incorrectly describe in their listing for the item. Some buyers may also miss
seeing these differences in the photos provided by the seller. Unfortunately, as discussed above, many painted
hens and roosters are listed as Burmese, when they are not! The key to determining which items are Burmese
and which are painted is simple enough by studying the bottoms and interiors of the item in question. Painted
pieces are generally left unpainted on the interiors of the hen and rooster tops and bases, while those that are
Burmese show that color on the interiors of the top and base. Fenton's standing painted roosters show their
actual color on the underside of the rooster.


Using Fenton's embedded Decade Indicator can help determine which colors are which, based on the decade
during which the Fenton hen or rooster was made. This can help collectors avoid duplicate hen on nest purchases,
even when the colors/treatments of the hens and roosters seem almost identical.


Often the Seller's descriptions of the color(s) of the Fenton hens and roosters they list is subjective and does not
necessarily describe the color's name accurately, or with the name of the colors &/or treatments used by Fenton.
The last 2 letters, or a combination of a number and a letter, are used by Fenton as Color Codes to complete the
ware number for specific hen on nest dishes.



There are several colors that have been used to produce Fenton's hens and roosters, with special treatments and
glass types also used. Learning what these colors and treatments look like is a major step towards learning to
recognize which color is which.
How can collectors and sellers determine the Fenton colors, glass types and treatments of their
hens and roosters? Read on below to begin learning how to avoid duplicate purchases of the
same color.
with a painted #4680 Rooster Box on the right.  Although at first glance these Rooster Boxes appear similar, the
Fenton Rooster Box shown on the right, ware # 4680 FK, is made of ivory glass that's been painted in the Brown
rooster top and his base reveal they have been left unpainted, showing the original color of the rooster top and
base, in this case ivory.  The Burmese rooster top and base are the same inside and out.
Enjoy the Art of Online Fenton Art Glass Collecting~
For Collectors, by Collectors.
Often Sellers who are not familiar with Fenton's colors, glass treatments
and/or glass types tend to describe Fenton's colors in their own words, often
and costly to Buyers, to say the least.  

One seller's "green" may be another seller's "blue," especially when using  
computer displays which can and do vary from device to device in how colors
appear.  Frequently sellers describe Fenton's painted hens and roosters as
Burmese, when they are actually describing white satin hens and roosters
that have been hand painted & air brushed.  

Burmese is a colored glass type, and not simply a top treatment, such as
paint, glossy, satin finishes are.  Looking at the interiors of the hen & rooster
tops and their bases, including the underside of the base, can help determine
which of Fenton's painted wares are actually Burmese. This is because
Fenton did not paint the undersides, or interiors of their painted wares,
allowing the original color to show.  Therefor, the Burmese color will still
show on the inside of Burmese hen or rooster tops and bases.  

As of January 2013, with Fenton no longer producing glass, there has never
been a Burmese hen on nest of any mould produced in-line by Fenton.   
Burmese is often mistakenly used to describe painted hens and roosters,
however since Fenton leaves the underside of their wares, and the interiors
of their Hen on Nest and Rooster Box moulds unpainted, the original color is
visible for the seller, and should also be for potential buyers, via quality
photos.




To help solve the color issue, a Section on Color with Photo Galleries, has been included as the perfect companion for the
Sections about the specific hens, roosters and other poultry forms produced by Fenton.  These Galleries feature the various
Fenton colors, glass types, and the decorative designs of Fenton's poultry forms which are known to have been produced
with notes about the colors and treatments.

In later years the Spring release of Fenton's Folk Art Animals Collection became quite popular, and
within a few years Fenton's Folk Art Animals Collection began to include more than a decorated
#4680 Rooster Box and Hen on Nest to complete this annual Fenton Spring Collection. In a fairly
short time, other pieces, such as their 3 sizes of Standing Roosters, Bunny Boxes, and for a brief
time the smaller, #6483 Rooster Box, were added to the Fenton Folk Art Animal Collection, all
decorated with that year's Fenton Folk Art Animals Theme-with nearly all an instant success!  

For many years Fenton's Folk Art animals, & other decorative themes for animals were designed by
Stacy Williams, Robin Spindler, Martha Reynolds & Kim Barley-considered by many to be among the
best. Not too surprisingly many of the designers are also expert painters. From hand-painted,
airbrushed Art with realism on an Ivory Glass base, some with hand rubbed gilding (gold) as the
finish, to beautiful, delicate designs on large Roosters fully made of Burmese, there's no doubt,
Fenton's Folk Art Collection & their impressive roster of covered Hen on Nest dishes, Covered
Rooster Boxes, Standing Roosters, Shelf Sitters & other Covered Animal Dishes seem to capture the
hearts of collectors!
PC displays & monitors do not always show colors as they actually appear in person, which can make determining which
Fenton colors are which, especially from online photos, difficult at best.  Learning to recognize Fenton's colors and their
assortment of treatments used on their glass, including their hens and roosters, is helpful to determine the color of the
item, to avoid duplicate purchases, or the purchase of a hen or rooster listed as Burmese, when it is not.  
Fenton's painted wares are actually Burmese. This is because Fenton did not paint the undersides, or interiors of their
painted wares, allowing the original color to show.  Therefor, the Burmese color will still show on the inside of Burmese
hen or rooster tops and bases.  

As of January 2013, with Fenton no longer producing glass, there has never been a Burmese hen on nest of any mould
produced in-line by Fenton.   Burmese is often mistakenly used to describe painted hens and roosters, however since
Fenton leaves the underside of their wares, and the interiors of their Hen on Nest and Rooster Box moulds unpainted, the
original color is visible for the seller, and should also be for potential buyers, via quality photos.